How Effective Are Your Daily Emails?

Articles on email marketing are ten a penny, but there are very few that address the subject of writing effective every day emails. How many emails do you send a day on average? 50, 100, 200? You may think they're not important because you're not actually selling anything, they're just correspondence, right? Wrong. They are…

Articles on email marketing are ten a penny, but there are very few that address the subject of writing effective every day emails.

How many emails do you send a day on average? 50, 100, 200? You may think they're not important because you're not actually selling anything, they're just correspondence, right?

Wrong. They are very much a part of the sales process.

How many times have you emailed a company and never got a response? Of have you asked several questions in an email only to get a reply with half the answers, so you have to send another email to get the remaining information?

Every email you send will have an impact on your efficiency and how your customers view you as a company.

Here is a short good practice guide on writing effective emails.

Subject lines

If you want your email to be opened, make sure you give it a clear and compelling subject line.

Something that reads: Hello, FYI, It's been a while, or 2012 Report on the risk analysis of … will not grab attention and therefore will not be acted quickly.

However, if you start it off with something like:

  • We need your decision today
  • Please reply yes or no
  • Your feedback is needed for this afternoon's meeting

You're more likely to grab the recipient's attention.

Call to action

Far from only being in the domain of marketing, a call to action is also an essential element of your daily emails.

No one sits around waiting for emails to turn up, so if you need an urgent response, tell them. Also, do not leave it to the end, they may not read that far, so get in the first sentence.

Chasing

How long should you leave it before you chase for a response?

That is really going to depend on the time scale you're working to, but be realistic. Do not chase them after only an hour or so, if it's not life or death (and if you do need a response that quickly it would be faster to phone) send a polite chaser or call them after a day or two.

Be brief

If you try to cover too many points in one email you're going to cause confusion.

Keep your message or request brief and to the point.

If you do need to cover several things, list them as bullet points to help the recipient respond fully.

Granted, none of this is ground-breaking, but considering some of the emails I get it's well worth going over the basics.

Your communication skills will have an impact on your efficiency, productivity and customer service perception. Make sure all your emails are clear and to the point and if you need to ask something that's quite complex, just pick up the phone.