10 Ways to Save Big By Choosing the Right Cushioning

1. Bubble Wrap Get the most bang for your bubble wrap buck by only using it in conjunction with a box or other outside packaging. Securing items with external bubble wrap wastes product and money because of its tension to puncture. Never wrap heavy objects with bubble wrap, because the weight of the object can…

1. Bubble Wrap

Get the most bang for your bubble wrap buck by only using it in conjunction with a box or other outside packaging. Securing items with external bubble wrap wastes product and money because of its tension to puncture.

Never wrap heavy objects with bubble wrap, because the weight of the object can puncture the wrap. The most efficient use of bubble wrap is for cushioning smaller, more delicate objects. It's also crucial to always wrap with the bubbles facing towards the product, or inward.

2. Foam Peanuts

Use foam peanuts to absorb shock and keep items inside boxes in place during shipment. You can save hundreds per year by re-using foam peanuts included in any returns and recycling them to be packed into new shipments.

Tip: Only reuse peanuts made from polystyrene. Foam peanuts made from biodegradable materials tend to break down during shipping, and can only be used once.

3. Air Pillows

When using air pillows to absorb impact and protect breakables, make sure to pillow the most stable areas of the item. For example, focus on the corners of a microwave, as opposed to the delicate glass. It's important that the air pillows never touch screens or glass in order to prevent scratching or breakage.

4. Kraft Paper

Double up on bubble wrap and durable kraft paper to offer delicate items the most protection possible. Combining the two will save you money by guaranteeing that fragile items do not break during shipping.

5. Tissue Paper

When cushioning glasses with tissue paper, begin by rolling each glass on the paper in a diagonal motion. You'll end up with a long tube of extra tissue which can then be stuffed into the empty cavity of the glass, providing internal cushioning and preventing it from being crushed.

6. Foam Rolls

Using foam roll is the most economical way to accomplish void fill in larger boxes. Skip foam peanuts and air pillows, which can get expensive if you're filling a larger space, and protect larger items by cushioning them with foam roll.

7. Chip Board

If you're keeping a palette in place with opaque stretch film, it's essential to use chip boards in order to prevent damage upon arrival. Opaque coverings prevent receivers from seeing what's inside the shipment, making damage from box cutters and knives more likely. Chip boards offer a money-saving layer of protection.

8. Newsprint

Always use a double layer when packing with newsprint. Wrap glassware to prevent scratching, and be sure to fill vases and glasses with a heavy layer of crumpled newsprint in order to prevent them from being crushed.

9. Corrugated Pads

Place corrugated pads beneath, in between and on top of large items before shipment. Pads placed between the items will keep them in place and prevent movement during travel, while pads placed on top of the palette will prevent damage due to dust and moisture.

10. Mailers

When shipping with canned mailers, be sure to measure the length and width of the product being shipped. Allow an additional 2-3 “of space in the mailer to offer premium protection of delicate products.

Which type of cushioning is used most often at your company?